Pipelines Threaten Wild Horses?

They are usually buried six to eight feet deep and unless you were there during construction, the only indication you have of their existence is the occasional surface marker or casing vents at road crossings.  A clear-cut strip through a wooded area may be another indication.

The two markers on the right in this image are casing vents.  Third from right is a marker for aerial patrols.  The other four provide a general location of the pipeline and usually include warnings to “Call before you dig.”

Pipeline Markers 11-17-21

The advocates are always looking for new ways to divert your attention from the two greatest threats to our wild horses: Themselves and the public-lands ranchers.

RELATED: Advocate Blames Roundups on Pipelines, Mines!

How Pipelines Affect Wild Horses 11-17-22

Sand Wash Advocates Assume Mopping-Up Role

Their home page suggests that they exist mostly to get rid of wild horses, although their workload was lightened by last year’s roundup.  Note the Gen 1 gauged projectors.

They must have carte blanche from the BLM, as they are providing a valuable service for the public-lands ranchers.

All they ask in return is a small donation to help them continue their important work.

RELATED: TOLDYA: Advocates Consigned to Mopping-Up Role.

Sand Wash Advocates 01-17-22

Rock Springs Roundup Day 102

Operations resumed on January 6.  Gather stats through January 16:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Captured: 4,045, up from 3,686 on Day 99
  • Average daily take: 39.7
  • Capture goal: 4,400
  • Removal goal: 3,500
  • Returned: 580, no change from Day 99
  • Deaths: 37, up from 33 on Day 99
  • Shipped: 3,476, up from 3,222 on Day 99

One horse died on Day 101 of unspecified causes and three others were put down due to club feet.  The death rate is 0.9%.

The total includes 1,555 stallions, 1,653 mares and 837 foals.  The gather page shows 1,554 stallions and 1,640 mares.

Foals represented 20.7% of the horses captured.  Of the adults, 48.5% were male and 51.5% were female.

The percentage of foals is consistent with a herd growth rate of 16% per year, assuming a 5% death rate.

Body condition scores were not reported.

Gather activity has moved to White Mountain and Little Colorado but the location of the trap site was not specified.

Rock Springs HMAs 10-13-21

The number of horses shipped has not been included in the cumulative totals and the figure above is based on the daily reports.

If 4,032 horses have been captured as stated at the gather page, 3,476 have been shipped and 37 have died, the maximum number of horses that could be returned to the area is 519, not 580 as stated in the cumulative totals.  The numbers don’t balance.

The number of horses removed to date, based on the cumulative totals, is 3,452, about 99% of the project goal.

Other statistics:

  • AML: 2,165 (across five HMAs)
  • Forage assigned to horses: 25,980 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 5,105
  • Forage liberated to date: 42,444 AUMs per year, adjusted for horses returned
  • Water liberated to date: 35,370 gallons per day, adjusted for horses returned
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 191,791 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMAs by livestock: 15,982 (32% of off-range holding)
  • True AML: 18,147

RELATED: Rock Springs Roundup Day 99.

Humane Alternative to Roundups and Off-Range Holding?

A 2019 news release by IDA titled “These Guns Can Save Wild Horses and Burros” features a graduate from the SCC School of PZP Darting holding a Gen 1 gauged projector with scope and black satin finish.  She joins ranks with other foot soldiers advancing the Montana Solution across western rangelands.

IDA Darter 01-16-22

Although propelled by a compressed gas, a powder charges goes off when the dart, formally known as an RDD, strikes the target, driving the payload into the animal.

Pneu-Dart Impact 01-03-22

Injuries are not uncommon, but where the technique is practiced, natural behaviors and youngsters are.  Livestock flourish as the herds are decimated.

VR Darting Injury 09-15-21

You have to give them credit: The advocates speak with one voice, although it’s the wrong voice.

Ending permitted grazing, confining the ranchers to their base properties, and letting them pay market rates to feed their animals—like the rest of us—apparently has never crossed their minds.

RELATED: Can Darting Programs Compete with Helicopter Roundups?

Roy Flip-Flopping on Rock Springs Roundup?

A few weeks ago, the Campaign Against America’s Wild Horses joined forces with the Animal Welfare Institute to sponsor a petition asking the BLM to cancel the roundup and get rid of the horses with PZP, described euphemistically as “managing these historic wild horses humanely in the wild with proven fertility control.”

Who benefits as wild horses are removed from the range?  The public-lands ranchers, of course, but that was omitted from the petition.

Advocates are the Predators 11-30-21

Now, in a new commentary published today by the Casper Star-Tribune, Roy appears to side with groups that seek the removal of livestock from areas identified for wild horses, even though her organization refused to sign a letter last year requesting the Secretary of the Interior to do exactly that.

RELATED: Signatories of Rock Springs Petition Duped by Advocates?

How Many Wild Horses Can the Pancake Complex Support?

The AML is 638, so that’s it, right?

The Complex can only support 638 wild horses if you assign 85% of the authorized forage to privately owned cattle and sheep.

Tables 3 – 6 in the Final EA for resource enforcement actions provide data for livestock AUMs inside the Complex, which were summarized in this post.  The numbers in the Preliminary EA carried over to the Final EA with no changes.

Livestock receive 43,344 AUMs per year inside the Complex, assuming the resource is evenly distributed across the allotments.

That forage would support an additional 43,344 ÷ 12 = 3,612 wild horses.

The True AML, the number of horses the Complex could support it it was managed principally for wild horses, as specified in the original statute, is 638 + 3,612 = 4,250.

The pre-gather population of 3,244 is well within this range.

The number of horses displaced by permitted grazing represents about 7% of those in off-range holding.

If public-lands ranching was ended in this and fifteen other such areas, all of those horses could be returned to the range.

The ranchers, bureaucrats and advocates don’t want you knowing any of this because it torpedoes the justification for their roundups and fertility control programs.

RELATED: Pancake Roundup Announced.

Thriving Ecological Balance-3

Pancake Roundup Day 4

The incident began on January 11.  Gather stats through January 14:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Animals captured: 514, up from 157 on Day 1
  • Average daily take: 128.5
  • Capture goal: 2,060
  • Removal goal: 2,030
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 9, up from 2 on Day 1
  • Shipped: 309 (none shipped on Day 1)

A stallion died unexpectedly on Day 2 and a mare was put down.  Three horses were euthanized on Day 3 followed by two on Day 4.  The death rate is now 1.8%.

The cumulative totals include 213 stallions, 233 mares and 68 foals.

Youngsters represented 13.2% of the horses captured, consistent with a herd growth rate of 8% per year, assuming a 5% death rate.

Of the adults, 47.8% were stallions and 52.2% were mares.

Body condition scores were not reported.

The location of the trap site within the Complex was not provided.

Pancake Complex Map 01-07-22

Day 4 ended with 196 unaccounted-for animals.

The number of horses removed to date is 514.  Mares returned to the Complex will be treated with population suppression of unspecified type.

Other statistics:

  • AML: 638 (across two HMAs, one WHT and one HA)
  • Forage assigned to horses: 7,656 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 3,244
  • Forage liberated to date: 6,168 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 5,140 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 43,344 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: 3,612
  • True AML: 4,250
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 3.5 wild horses per thousand acres
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Pancake Roundup in Progress.

Draft EA for Diamond Valley Oil Well Available for Public Review

Comments will be accepted until February 11, according to Thursday’s news release, and can be submitted by email, as explained in the project description.

Table B2 in the EA indicates that the Proposed Action, discussed in Section 2.2, would affect 4.8 acres of the Diamond Hills North HMA and 0.3 acres of the Diamonds Hills South HMA, displacing 1/200th of a wild horse at typical stocking rates.

The total surface disturbance is 26.9 acres, as detailed in Table 2-1.

Losses attributable to permitted grazing, which affects entire HMAs and beyond, are far greater.

The Proposed Action includes 4.3 acres of the Red Rock Allotment, per Table B2.

RELATED: Wildcatters Heading to Diamond Hills North HMA?

Rock Springs Roundup Day 99

Operations resumed on January 6.  Gather stats through January 13:

  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Horses captured: 3,686, up from 3,552 on Day 96
  • Average daily take: 37.2
  • Capture goal: 4,400
  • Removal goal: 3,500
  • Returned: 580, up from 488 on Day 96
  • Deaths: 33, up from 24 on Day 96
  • Shipped: 3,222, up from 3,152 on Day 96

A mare was put down on Day 97 due to bad knees.  Three horses were euthanized on Day 98 due to broken legs and emaciation.  Five more were eliminated on Day 99 due to bad knees and club feet.

All survived the chase and would be alive today if the roundup had been called to off.

The death rate has climbed from 0.7% on Day 96 to 0.9% on Day 99.  The death rate since the incident resumed is 3.0%.

The total includes 1,432 stallions, 1,502 mares and 752 foals.  The gather page shows 1,429 stallions and 1,489 mares.

Foals represented 20.4% of the horses captured.  Of the adults, 48.8% were male and 51.2% were female.

The percentage of foals is consistent with a herd growth rate of 15% per year, assuming a 5% death rate.

Body condition scores were not reported.

Gather activity has moved to White Mountain and Little Colorado but the location of the trap site was not specified.

Rock Springs HMAs 10-13-21

The number of horses shipped has not been included in the cumulative totals and the figure above is based on the daily reports.

If 3,671 horses have been captured as stated at the gather page, 3,222 have been shipped and 33 have died, the maximum number of horses that could be returned to the area is 416, not 580 as stated in the cumulative totals.  The numbers don’t balance.

The number of horses returned to the range has grown by 20 since Day 96 but the jump was not explained in the daily reports.

The number of horses removed to date, based on the cumulative totals, is 3,163, about 90% of the project goal.

Other statistics:

  • AML: 2,165 (across five HMAs)
  • Forage assigned to horses: 25,980 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 5,105
  • Forage liberated to date: 38,136 AUMs per year, adjusted for horses returned
  • Water liberated to date: 31,780 gallons per day, adjusted for horses returned
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 191,791 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMAs by livestock: 15,982 (32% of off-range holding)
  • True AML: 18,147

RELATED: Rock Springs Roundup Day 96.

What’s Happening to Wild Horses and Burros in Utah?

The same thing as in other western states: Most of the resources have been fenced off and sold to public-lands ranchers, so, of course, they’re going to venture out of their habitats and into roads and private properties in search of food and water.

It’s not overpopulation, as the writer of this story for KTVX News of Salt Lake City would have you believe.

How Many Wild Horses Can the Carter Reservoir HMA Support?

For a quick estimate, convert the livestock AUMs inside the HMA to wild horses and add the result to the AML.

Livestock receive 3,646 AUMs per year inside the allotment and the allotment is about three times larger than the HMA, so the forage assigned to livestock inside the HMA should be about 3,646 ÷ 3 = 1,215 AUMs per year, assuming the resource is evenly distributed across the parcel.

That forage would support an additional 1,215 ÷ 12 = 101 wild horses, for a True AML of 35 + 101 = 136.

The stocking rate at the new AML would be 5.8 wild horses per thousand acres, or 172 acres per horse.

The target rate across all HMAs is one wild horse per thousand acres, because they are managed primarily for livestock.

RELATED: Spanish Ancestry Found in Carter Reservoir Mustangs.

Spanish Ancestry Found in Carter Reservoir Mustangs

Tests indicate the herd may have the highest percentage of individuals with ancient Spanish-Iberian DNA of any herd in the western U.S. investigated to date, according to an EIN news release dated January 13.

The HMA straddles the CA-NV state line and lies mostly within the Sand Creek grazing allotment, as shown in the Western Watersheds map.

The 35 horses allowed by plan in the HMA receive 420 AUMs per year, while livestock in the allotment, which is about three times larger than the HMA, receive 3,646 AUMs per year, according to the Allotment Master report.

RELATED: Nuisance Roundup Announced for Carter Reservoir HMA.

Carter Reservoir Grazing Allotment 01-13-22

Status of Desatoya Allotments

Three are in the Stillwater Field Office and one is in the Mount Lewis Field Office.

Desatoya HMA Map 01-11-22

Three of the allotments offer year-round cattle grazing, according to Table 3-2 of the Final EA, and all four are in the Improve category, according to the Allotment Master Reports [Stillwater | Mount Lewis].

The HMA, at 161,678 total acres (public and private), represents 23% of the 704,688 total acres in the allotments.

RELATED: Desatoya Roundup Announced.