Price of Hay Still Going Up

On July 3, the price was $19 per bale for 20 bales or more.  Today, the price was $25 per bale, a 32% increase in six months.

The average horse would consume around five bales per month, putting the cost of feeding him at $125 per AUM.

Adopters will spend $1,500 on feed before they receive the second half of the $1,000 incentive, leaving them with a $500 deficit.

The price to graze livestock on public lands is $1.35 per AUM.  The fee for the 2022 season should be announced in a few weeks.

RELATED: Price of Hay Up Again.

Corral Expansion Inching Along

The loop-leg pipe panels ordered in early October have been stood up but nothing has been secured.  Bow gates were already on hand.

This space will connect the corral, out of frame on the right in the aerial view, to the barn, out of frame on the left.

Partitions in the barn, where stalls used to be, have been removed, providing another shelter and feeding area for the horses.  Overview of project in this video.

Corral Expansion Inching Along 12-19-21

Fixing Wet Spots

A few weeks ago this corner of the corral was a pond.  The addition of some fill material made things better but it was still wet, suggesting there was another source of water.

You might point to the horses in the shelter, and you’d be right, but the hose used to fill their water buckets, seen in the photo, was leaking.  That was fixed on December 9.

How do you know if you addressed the cause of a problem?  It goes away.

Getting rid of the horses is not an option.  Throwing out some kitty litter to absorb the moisture doesn’t fix the leak and only prolongs the problem.

Fixing Wet Spots 12-11-21

Price of Hay Up Again

On July 3, the price was $19 per bale for 20 bales or more.  Today, the price was $24 per bale, a 26% increase in just four months.

The average horse would consume around five bales per month, putting the cost of feeding him at $120 per AUM.

Price to graze livestock on your public lands?  Steady at $1.35 per AUM.

Adopters will burn through the $1,000 incentive in about eight months.

RELATED: Price of Hay Still Climbing.

Price of Hay Still Climbing

On July 3, a bale of alfalfa-grass sold for $19.  Yesterday, the price was $23, a 21% increase.  That’s with the quantity discount.  The single-bale price is now $24.

If this pattern is true in other areas, what will be the effect on horse owners and adopters who were struggling to get by in the summer?

A horse would need at least five of these bales each month, given their smaller size and weight.  That works out to $115 per AUM or more.

The government pays around $60 per AUM for horses in long-term holding.

Ranchers pay $1.35 per AUM to graze their livestock on your public lands, including those set aside for wild horses.

RELATED: Cost of Hay Rising.

Who Will Look After the Nokotas When Frank Is Gone?

Brother Leo died unexpectedly three years ago and now some are wondering what will happen to the herd when Frank passes on, according to a story appearing in today’s edition of the Grand Forks Herald.

There are currently abut 300 head in his care, thought to be descendants of Sitting Bull’s horses.

Their predecessors were removed from Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the 1980s and 1990s.  The horses you see in the park today are not related.

Insiders are looking for a benefactor to secure the horses’ future when the time comes.

RELATED: New Film About Nokota Horses in the Works.