Chemehuevi Roundup Ends

Operations concluded on or about September 21, according to information at the gather page, with 243 burros captured, 242 shipped and one dead.

The gather page indicated capture and removal goals of 275 each but the latest schedule puts the targets at 225 each.  The incident did not appear in the previous version.

The death on September 17 was attributed to the roundup.  No details were given.

The death rate was 0.4%.

The capture total included 106 jacks, 93 jennies and 43 foals.

Youngsters represented 17.7% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 53.3% were male and 46.7% were female.

The daily reports did not provide breakdowns of jacks, jennies and foals.

The sum of those figures falls short of the total by one.

The incident was not announced at the BLM news site.

RELATED: Chemehuevi Nuisance Roundup in the Works?

AIP Reforms Not Working?

A report produced by the Campaign Against America’s Wild Horses shows changes to the Adoption Incentive Program have not reduced the flow of wild horses into kill pens, according to a story posted yesterday by the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The findings include 1,020 animals over three years that were sold to kill buyers and presumably shipped to slaughter in Canada and Mexico.

Western Horse Watchers estimates that the group and its affiliates got rid of 2,000 to 3,000 wild horses during the same period.

Don’t be fooled by the advocates!  Their downstream focus guarantees that more and more horses will be coming off the range, to the delight of the public-lands ranchers.

RELATED: Investigation Finds More Slaughter Cases in AIP.

Thriving Ecological Balance-3

Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 7

The incident began on September 17.  Gather stats through September 23:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a bettter way)
  • Captured: 462, up from 258 on Day 5
  • Average daily take: 66.0
  • Capture goal: 700
  • Removal goal: 400
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 1, up from zero on Day 5
  • Shipped: 316, up from 217 on Day 5

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

A stallion was put down on Day 6 due to blindness in one eye.  He’d be alive today if there was no roundup.

The capture total includes 172 stallions, 195 mares and 95 foals.

Youngsters represented 20.6% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 46.9% were male and 53.1% were female.

The percentage of foals has decreased since Day 5, suggesting the herd growth rate may be closer to 16% per year, given a death rate of 5% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMA and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Cedar Mountain HMA Map 01-29-22

Day 7 ended with 145 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 390
  • Forage assigned to horses: 4,680 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 920
  • Forage liberated to date: 5,544 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 4,620 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 17,068 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMA by permitted grazing: 1,422
  • True AML: 1,812
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 8.6 horses per thousand acres
  • Horses displaced from HMA by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

The government collects $23,042 per year in grazing fees from ranching activity inside the HMA while it spends $2,595,150 per year to care for the horses displaced thereby.

Would you say that permitted grazing is a wise use of the public lands?

RELATED: Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 5.

Calico Roundup, Day 13

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 22:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a better way)
  • Captured: 639, up from 508 on Day 11
  • Average daily take: 49.2
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 17, up from 15 on Day 11
  • Shipped: 551, up from 478 on Day 11

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

Two stallions were put down on Day 13.  The death rate is 2.7%.

The capture total includes 230 stallions, 302 mares and 107 foals.

Youngsters represented 16.7% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 43.2% were male and 56.8% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 17% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 11 ended with 71 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 7,668 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 6,390 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 11.

Foal-Free Friday, the Advocates Have a Better Way Edition

A story by KLAS News about the Calico roundup concludes with this remark:

The BLM says the ranges can’t support the animals, citing deteriorating health conditions in the herds.  Wild horse advocates counter that the horses are removed to make room for commercial livestock that grazes on the same land.

This is not correct.  The advocates want the horses removed to make room for commercial livestock and they have a better way of doing it.

Consider these two scenarios for wild horse removal:

Method A

  • Initial population – 440
  • Final population – 250

Method B

  • Initial population – 440
  • Final population – 250

Which one corresponds to a cruel and costly helicopter roundup and which one was carried out with proven fertility control?

Method A, the Montana Solution, is the best choice because the horses were protected from removal.

Method B, a deadly helicopter roundup, is unacceptable because the horses were taken off the range by force.

This is what the advocates are selling!  They have nothing to offer America’s wild horses except continuation of their misery.

What’s their top priority?  To be loved and respected by the bureaucrats and ranchers.

As for you, they care mostly about your money.

As for the horses, they couldn’t care less.

RELATED: Foal-Free Friday, Fighting Crime on the Virginia Range.

Advocates are the Predators 11-30-21

Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 5

The incident began on September 17.  Gather stats through September 21:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a bettter way)
  • Captured: 258, up from 223 on Day 3
  • Average daily take: 51.6
  • Capture goal: 700
  • Removal goal: 400
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: None
  • Shipped: 217, up from 153 on Day 3

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

The capture total includes 100 stallions, 100 mares and 58 foals.

Youngsters represented 22.5% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 50% were male and 50% were female.

The herd growth rate may be close to 20% per year, a figure used by land managers to predict herd sizes and justify management actions, given a birth rate of 23% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMA and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Cedar Mountain HMA Map 01-29-22

Day 5 ended with 41 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 390
  • Forage assigned to horses: 4,680 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 920
  • Forage liberated to date: 3,096 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 2,580 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 17,068 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMA by permitted grazing: 1,422
  • True AML: 1,812
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 8.6 horses per thousand acres
  • Horses displaced from HMA by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 3.

Livestock Can Stay But Horses Must Go?

Readers of Western Horse Watchers will not be suprised by anything in this article, writted by a trained PZP darter and appearing today in CounterPunch.

Is she trying to atone for her sins?  The logo on her T-shirt should say In Defense of Livestock.

IDA Darter 01-16-22

The column may have been written over the summer, around the time of the Piceance roundup.  It is not a plug for the Montana Solution.

The management plans assign most of the resources to privately owned livestock in areas set aside for wild horses.

Once you understand that, all of the downstream events, referred to on these pages as resource enforcement actions, which include roundups, darting programs, sex ratio skewing, adoption, training and sale with or without limitations, make perfect sense.

Devil’s Garden Roundup, Day 10, Transparency Not a Law Edition

Today the report jumped from September 19 to September 21.  Results for September 20 were not published.

Devils Garden Roundup Day 10 09-22-22

More information may be available on socialist media but Western Horse Watchers won’t read it or link to it.

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Unknown
  • Captured: 100
  • Average daily take: 10
  • Capture goal: Unknown
  • Removal goal: Unknown
  • Returned: Unknown
  • Deaths: Unknown
  • Shipped: Unknown
  • Unaccounted-for: Unknown
  • Location of trap: Unknown
  • Destination of captured animals: Unknown
  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 402
  • Pre-gather population: Unknown
  • Forage assigned to livestock inside WHT: 15,711 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from WHT by permitted grazing: 1,309
  • True AML: 1,711
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 6.6 horses per thousand acres

The government collects $21,210 per year in grazing fees from ranching activity inside the WHT while it spends $2,388,925 per year to care for the horses displaced thereby.

Would you say that permitted grazing is a wise use of the public lands?

RELATED: Devil’s Garden Roundup, Day 6, No Need to Know Edition.

Calico Roundup, Day 11

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 20:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a better way)
  • Captured: 508, up from 459 on Day 9
  • Average daily take: 46.2
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 15, up from 12 on Day 9
  • Shipped: 478, up from 404 on Day 9

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

Three horses were put down on Day 10 as acts of mercy, raising the death rate from 2.6% to 3.0%.

The capture total includes 197 stallions, 233 mares and 78 foals.

Youngsters represented 15.4% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 45.8% were male and 54.2% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 15% per year.

A better estimate would be 10% per year, assuming a death rate of 5% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 11 ended with 15 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 6,096 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 5,080 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 9.

Climate Change Threatens Wild Horses and Burros?

The topic is so important that the commie-pinko-fags at Google added this statement to the video:

Climate change refers to long-term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns, mainly caused by human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels.

This story by KERO News of Bakersfield looks at the Piute roundup, which has taken 16 burros off the range since it began on August 19.

Long-term shifts, like modern attention spans, cover 24 to 36 hours.

The bureaucrats and advocates will point to man-made climate change, or anything else they can invent, to justify the removal of these animals from their lawful home, leaving more and more resources to privately owned livestock.

RELATED: Piute Roundup in Progress.

BLM to Yank More Horses and Burros from Cibola-Trigo HMA?

The project targets animals outside the HMA, according to the CX, but the map in Attachment 2 indicates inside the HMA.

The Proposed Action would capture 85 burros and 15 horses on private property near the CA-AZ state line.

Cibola-Trigo Nuisance Roundup Map 09-21-22

The CX was posted to the project folder with no opportunities for public comment.

Burros were removed from the area last month and last year.

The management plan allows 150 wild horses and 165 wild burros.

The roundup may or may not be announced at the BLM news site and would likely occur in FY 2023, which begins on October 1.

Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 3

The incident began on September 17.  Gather stats through September 19:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a bettter way)
  • Captured: 223, up from 108 on Day 1
  • Average daily take: 74.3
  • Capture goal: 700
  • Removal goal: 400
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: None
  • Shipped: 153, up from zero on Day 1

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

The capture total includes 83 stallions, 87 mares and 53 foals.

Youngsters represented 23.8% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 48.8% were male and 51.2% were female.

The herd may be growing at a rate of 20% per year, a figure used by land managers to predict herd sizes and justify management actions, given a birth rate of 24% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMA and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Cedar Mountain HMA Map 01-29-22

Day 3 ended with 70 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 390
  • Forage assigned to horses: 4,680 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 920
  • Forage liberated to date: 2,676 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 2,230 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 17,068 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMA by permitted grazing: 1,422
  • True AML: 1,812
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 8.6 horses per thousand acres
  • Horses displaced from HMA by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Cedar Mountain Roundup Begins.

Livestock Rule the Range?

The opinion piece picked up today by the Carlsbad Current Argus originally appeared at Writers on the Range, an op-ed syndication service created by High Country News but now independent.

The site posted another column about wild horses that challenges some of the notions in the first article but hedges the argument with a remark about on-range management using “proven fertility control,” code words for “off the range.”

The wild horse and burro program has been a drag on the grazing program for 50 years.

RELATED: Wild Horses Rule the Range?

Wild Horses Rule the Range?

So says the writer of an opinion piece in the Carlsbad Current Argus.

You only need to look at the data.

The BLM assigns most of the forage on public lands to privately owned cattle and sheep, even in areas set aside for horses and burros.

Horses and burros receive about 324,000 AUMs per year on 27 million acres, compared to 12 million AUMs per year on 155 million acres for livestock.

Livestock can access 5.7 times more land than horses and burros, but the number of animals allowed by plan, equivalent to one million wild horses, is 37 times higher.

Ranching interests control the range, not wild horses.

RELATED: Livestock Outnumber Horses and Burros on Public Lands?

Calico Roundup, Day 9

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 18:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly
  • Captured: 459, up from 351 on Day 7
  • Average daily take: 51.0
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 12, up from 8 on Day 7
  • Shipped: 404, up from 251 on Day 7

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

Three horses were put down on Day 8, followed by one more on Day 9.  Most would be alive today if there was no roundup.

The death rate is 2.6%.

The capture total includes 180 stallions, 208 mares and 71 foals.

Youngsters represented 15.5% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 46.4% were male and 53.6% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 16% per year.

A better estimate would be 11% per year, assuming a death rate of 5% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 9 ended with 43 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 5,508 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 4,590 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 7.

Currituck Herd Adds New Colt

He was born late last week according to a story by The Coastland Times.

Birth rates and breeding patterns are detarmined by the advocates, not the horses.

The article did not indicate if his mom had been treated with the Montana Solution.

If not, they may stalking her with clipboards and darting rifles as they lecture you about keeping a safe distance and allowing mom and baby to bond.

In the wild horse world, the arrival of a new foal is not an event to appreciate but a problem to be fixed.

The Currituck advocates have adopted a naming convention similar to that of the Pryor Mountains: Foals born in 2020 have names beginning with “A,” names of foals born in 2021 begin with “B,” etc.

File under: Curated horse exhibits.

Use of Montana Solution Greater Than Originally Thought?

Immunocontraceptive vaccines such as PZP are currently being used in over 75 areas managed for wild horses and burros by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, according to the Final EA for management actions at the Marietta WBR.  Go to page 26 in the pdf.

The Park Service shut off the darting program at Assateague Island in 2016.

The latest roundup and fertility control schedule shows 14 HMAs with fertility control programs.

Where else is it in use and who are the organizers?

RELATED: Proposals Sought to Catch, Treat, Release Wild Horses and Burros.

Trajectory of Wildh Horse Fertility Control Program 04-11-21