Foal-Free Friday, We’re Not Who We Say We Are Edition

We have clever names.

We trick you into giving us money, hoping you won’t notice that our words don’t match our deeds.

We don’t believe what we say.  We don’t practice what we preach.  We criticize drillers, ranchers and miners but dart wild horses.

VR Darting Injury 09-15-21

We don’t like helicopter roundups but we think wild horses should be removed from their lawful homes in favor of privately owned livestock.

We envy the contractors and want a larger piece of the action.

We intend to be leaders in the wild horse removal industry.

We’re wild horse advocates and we have a better way.

RELATED: Foal-Free Friday, the Advocates Have a Better Way Edition.

Calico Roundup, Day 19

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 28:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a better way)
  • Captured: 802, up from 735 on Day 17
  • Average daily take: 42.2
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 25, up from 22 on Day 17
  • Shipped: 725, up from 688 on Day 17

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

A stallion and mare were put down on Day 18 as acts of mercy, followed by another stallion on Day 19.  Mercy means not getting what you deserve.

The death rate is 3.1%.

The capture total includes 299 stallions, 377 mares and 126 foals.

Youngsters represented 15.7% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 44.2% were male and 55.7% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 16% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 19 ended with 52 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

The capture and removal goals at the gather page have not changed despite new targets in the latest schedule.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 9,624 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 8,020 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

The pre-gather population exceeded the AML but not necessarily the number of horses the land can support.

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 17.

SHOCKER: FREES Network Supports Helicopter Roundups!

They’re the fastest and most efficient way to shift resources back to the public-lands ranchers.

They may be followed by relaxation of AUM curtailments, extension of grazing seasons and more flexible rules for pasture management.

So why wouldn’t a ranching advocacy group endorse them?

The advocates oppose them, claiming they’re cruel and costly, unless they lead to greater use of the Montana Solution, as in catch-treat-release.

They have a better way.

The article, appearing yesterday in St. George News, was written by staff at Utah State University Extension, sponsor of the FREES Network.

RELATED: FREES Agenda Posted.

Cedar Mountain Roundup Over

The incident concluded yesterday, according to a statement at the gather page, with 637 horses captured, 592 shipped, 38 released and eight dead.

The number of horses processed exceeded the number of horses captured by one.

The death rate was 1.3%.

The capture total included 248 stallions, 259 mares and 130 foals.

Youngsters represented 20.4% of the animals gathered, consistent with a herd growth rate of 15% per year.

Of the adults, 48.9% were male and 51.1% were female.

The capture goal was 700 and the removal goal was 400.

Fifty mares will be treated with GonaCon and returned to the HMA with twelve more stallions, bringing the net removal to 537, 34% more than planned.

RELATED: Cedar Mountain Pest Removal Starts This Week.

How Many Wild Horses and Burros in Off-Range Holding?

The Facility Report posted with other WHBAB meeting materials indicates 63,922 as of September 2022, compared to 56,676 in October 2021.

The on-range population was thought to be 82,384 on March 1, before peak foaling season and numerous roundups, according to the HMA Report.

The advocates have a solution—a better way as they describe it: Stop reproduction, let the herds die off, give most of the resources to the public-lands ranchers.

“We’re changing the way wild horse herds are managed, not their land.”

Pancake Gather Plan

Roughing It on the Range

No tar paper shacks here.  The ranch presented at 0:55 may be in Vale, one of the off-range pastures contracted by the BLM.  Only $37 million.

The Facility Report posted with other WHBAB meeting materials indicates it has a capacity of 1,000 geldings—stallions taken off their home range, cut, and sent there to die, in favor of the public-lands ranchers, courtesy of American taxpayers.

Nice work if you can get it.

WHBAB Meeting Materials Out for Review

Refer to the bullet list at the WHBAB home page.

Overpopulation means more horses than allowed by plan, not necessarily more horses than the land can support.

The total AML of 27,000 is small relative to the available resources because most of them have been assigned to privately owned livestock.

You don’t have a wild horse problem on America’s public lands, you have a resource management problem.

RELATED: WHBAB Meeting Announced.

WHB Infographic Image 09-27-22

Winery to Screen Redford’s Wild Horse Documentary

Eberle Winery will present a special screening of The Mustangs: America’s Wild Horses, a feature documentary produced by Robert Redford, Patti Scialfa Springsteen and Jessica Springsteen, according to an announcement by the Paso Robles Daily News.

Producer and Co-Director Steven Latham will join Neda Demayo, signatory to the “Path Forward” and founder of Return to Normal (Before WHB Act), to discuss the film.

The dialogue, like the film, will probably avoid resource management and permitted grazing in areas set aside for wild horses.

Western Horse Watchers was informed that the theme was overpopulation, ranchers are not the problem and PZP is the answer, with Demayo receiving excessive “air time.”

As for the Path Forward, support is much greater than you think.  Today, most of the advocacy groups are signatories in principle.

This search result from Google tells you everything you need to know.  The advocates are always looking for opportunities to implement their ruinous darting programs, with benefits accruing to the public-lands ranchers.

Advocates Focus on Fertility Control 09-27-22

The link pointed to a story originally produced by KUNR Radio in Reno.

RELATED: New Wild Horse Documentary Avoids Public-Lands Ranching?

Getting Rid of Wild Horses 03-18-22

Calico Roundup, Day 17

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 26:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a better way)
  • Captured: 735, up from 710 on Day 15
  • Average daily take: 43.2
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 22, up from 21 on Day 15
  • Shipped: 688, up from 654 on Day 15

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

Helicopters did not fly on Day 16.  The trap may have been moved to a new location.

A stallion was was put down on Day 17 due to a missing eye.  He survived the chase and would be alive today if there was no roundup.

The death rate is 3.0%.

The capture total includes 269 stallions, 346 mares and 120 foals.

Youngsters represented 16.3% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 43.7% were male and 56.3% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 16% per year.

The observed percentages of males and females are outside the range of variation attributable to a simple random process centered at 50% males / 50% females.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 17 ended with 25 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

The capture and removal goals at the gather page have not changed despite new targets in the latest schedule.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 8,820 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 7,350 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

The pre-gather population exceeded the AML but not necessarily the number of horses the land can support.

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 15.

Devil’s Garden Roundup, Day 15, Managing for Livestock Edition

The incident started on September 12.  Results through September 26:

Devils Garden Roundup Day 15 09-26-22

Body condition scores indicate more horses than allowed by plan, not more horses than the land can support.  If the horses were starving the scores would be lower.

More information may be available on socialist media but Western Horse Watchers won’t read it or link to it.

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Unknown
  • Captured: 196
  • Average daily take: 13.1
  • Capture goal: Unknown
  • Removal goal: Unknown
  • Returned: Unknown
  • Deaths: Unknown
  • Shipped: Unknown
  • Unaccounted-for: Unknown
  • Location of trap: Unknown
  • Destination of captured animals: Unknown
  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 402
  • Pre-gather population: Unknown
  • Forage assigned to livestock inside WHT: 15,711 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from WHT by permitted grazing: 1,309
  • True AML: 1,711
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 6.6 horses per thousand acres

The government collects $21,210 per year in grazing fees from ranching activity inside the WHT while it spends $2,388,925 per year to care for the horses displaced thereby.

Would you say that permitted grazing is a wise use of the public lands?

RELATED: Devil’s Garden Roundup, Day 10, Transparency Not a Law Edition.

Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 9

The incident began on September 17.  Gather stats through September 25:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a bettter way)
  • Captured: 620, up from 462 on Day 7
  • Average daily take: 68.9
  • Capture goal: 700
  • Removal goal: 400
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 6, up from 1 on Day 7
  • Shipped: 444, up from 316 on Day 7

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

A stallion was put down on Day 8 due to a broken leg, followed by four more stallions on Day 9 due to blindness and other deformities.

The death rate is 1.0%.

The capture total includes 243 stallions, 250 mares and 127 foals.

Youngsters represented 20.5% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 49.3% were male and 50.7% were female.

The observed percentage of foals suggests the herd growth rate may be closer to 16% per year, given a death rate of 5% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMA and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Cedar Mountain HMA Map 01-29-22

Day 9 ended with 170 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

The capture goal is 88% complete.  Operations will likely conclude this week.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 390
  • Forage assigned to horses: 4,680 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 920
  • Forage liberated to date: 7,440 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 6,200 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: 17,068 AUMs per year (estimated)
  • Horses displaced from HMA by permitted grazing: 1,422
  • True AML: 1,812
  • Stocking rate at new AML: 8.6 horses per thousand acres
  • Horses displaced from HMA by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

How can the HMA be overpopulated with 920 wild horses when the BLM authorizes privately owned livestock equivalent to 1,422 wild horses in the same area, on top of the 390 horses allowed by plan?

RELATED: Cedar Mountain Roundup, Day 7.

Bitner ACEC Scoping Period Ends This Week

The project will develop a management plan for an area of critical environmental concern in northwestern Nevada, according to the description in ePlanning.

The project map puts the location at the northeastern corner of the Bitner HMA, part of the Surprise Complex, and inside the Bitner Allotment.

Bitner ACEC Map 09-26-22

The allotment may stay in the Improve category permanently because of the ACEC.

The scoping letter is actually a handout that explains the project.

Comments will be accepted through September 30.

The allotment offers 69.1 AUMs per year per thousand acres to livestock, while the HMA offers a paltry 5.6 AUMs per year per thousand acres to wild horses.  Why is that?

Calico Roundup, Day 15

The incident began on September 10.  Gather stats through September 24:

  • Target: Horses
  • Type: Planned
  • Method: Helicopter
  • Category: Cruel and costly (advocates have a better way)
  • Captured: 710, up from 639 on Day 13
  • Average daily take: 47.3
  • Capture goal: 1,076
  • Removal goal: 1,036
  • Returned: None
  • Deaths: 21, up from 17 on Day 13
  • Shipped: 654, up from 551 on Day 13

The figures above are based on the daily reports, not the totals posted by the BLM.

One horse was put down on Day 14 due to pre-existing conditions, followed by three more on Day 15.  They survived the chase and would probably be alive today if there was no roundup.

The death rate jumped from 2.7% to 3.0%.

The capture total includes 263 stallions, 331 mares and 116 foals.

Youngsters represented 16.3% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 44.3% were male and 55.7% were female.

The herd can’t be growing at a rate of 20% per year with a birth rate of 16% per year.

Body condition scores were not provided.

The location of the trap site was not disclosed.

The HMAs and surrounding lands are subject to permitted grazing.

Calico Complex Map 09-07-22

Day 15 ended with 35 unaccounted-for animals.

Mares treated with fertility control may be returned to the area at a later date.

The capture and removal goals at the gather page have not changed despite new targets in the latest schedule.

Other statistics:

  • Horses allowed by plan (AML): 952
  • Forage assigned to horses: 11,424 AUMs per year
  • Pre-gather population: 1,593
  • Forage liberated to date: 8,520 AUMs per year
  • Water liberated to date: 7,100 gallons per day
  • Forage assigned to livestock: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by permitted grazing: Unknown
  • True AML: Unknown
  • Stocking rate at new AML: Unknown
  • Horses displaced from Complex by drilling and mining: Ask the advocates

RELATED: Calico Roundup, Day 13.

Why Won’t Advocates Be Honest About America’s Wild Horses?

They’d have to drop their support for the Montana Solution.

The numbers show the horses are being screwed by the bureaucrats in favor of the public-lands ranchers.

The advocates are trying to build a rapport with the bureaucrats and ranchers.

Protect Wild Horses from Advocates 08-29-21

Do you think they’re going to admit they’ve been wrong all these years?

The problem is resource management, not wild horses.

Wild Horse Freedom Rallies Focus on SAFE Act?

Interest in the bill, which died in committee last week according to a story posted yesterday by CBS News of Colorado, may have received a boost due to a report by the Campaign Against America’s Wild Horses about the adoption incentive program and the number of horses sent to kill pens.

The solution?  Replacing cash incentives with vouchers for veterinary care or training to gentle the animals.

Better yet, stop reproduction with the Montana Solution and let the herds die off.

The writer—not CAAWH—suggests the problem lies elsewhere.

“The Bureau of Land Management has said wild horse roundups are necessary because there aren’t enough resources for the horses, but as CBS4 Investigates reported in May, those lands are also shared by private ranchers who are allowed to graze their cattle and sheep there.”

You won’t hear that from CAAWH and their surrogates.

They intend to be leaders in the wild horse removal business, aiding and abetting the ranchers, as announced on September 15.

Next to the federal government, nobody’s getting rid of more wild horses than CAAWH and its army of nitwits.

RELATED: Wild Horse Freedom Rallies Return in September.

Protecting Wild Horses on Virginia Range 06-25-22

Chemehuevi Roundup Ends

Operations concluded on or about September 21, according to information at the gather page, with 243 burros captured, 242 shipped and one dead.

The gather page indicated capture and removal goals of 275 each but the latest schedule puts the targets at 225 each.  The incident did not appear in the previous version.

The death on September 17 was attributed to the roundup.  No details were given.

The death rate was 0.4%.

The capture total included 106 jacks, 93 jennies and 43 foals.

Youngsters represented 17.7% of the animals gathered.

Of the adults, 53.3% were male and 46.7% were female.

The daily reports did not provide breakdowns of jacks, jennies and foals.

The sum of those figures falls short of the total by one.

The incident was not announced at the BLM news site.

RELATED: Chemehuevi Nuisance Roundup in the Works?