BLM to Modernize Grazing Regulations on Public Lands

The project will streamline the grazing permit process and provide greater flexibility for land and resource management, according to a news release posted today.

Public comments can be submitted until February 28.  Project documentation can be found at this page.

As always, comments should be substantive.  For example, “The United States does not receive fair market value for forage consumed by domestic livestock on public lands, as required by FLPMA; the fee should be brought in line with market conditions.”

It’s one of the few things that hasn’t been touched by inflation.  If gasoline was priced like the grazing fee, you’d be paying about seventeen cents per gallon.

Be sure to compare the allotment map to the HMA map.  In which state is public-lands ranching the most prevalent?  Where is the largest grazing allotment?

The grazing program fact sheet says that the BLM collected $17.3 million for livestock grazing in 2018.  The fee that year was $1.41 per AUM, so 12.3 million AUMs were sold to the public-lands ranchers.

That’s two million cow/calf pairs on 155 million acres, assuming a six month grazing season, for a stocking rate of 12.9 cow/calf pairs per thousand acres.

The stocking rate for wild horses on BLM land is currently about three animals per thousand acres.

Now, which species is overpopulated?

Wild horses on public lands consume about one million AUMs per year.

The forage sold to public-lands ranchers would support ONE MILLION wild horses.

Approximately 50,000 wild horses are warehoused in off-range corrals and pastures.

Livestock allowed on public lands are worth over TWO BILLION DOLLARS, assuming half of them ship to slaughter.

Advocacy groups that push PZP are so far gone—and so out of touch—that you should not be giving them any of your money.

RELATED: Livestock Grazing in Nevada, Public-Lands Ranching Is Big Business.

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